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What is ARM

  Time:2012-05-07 15:43

ARM is a 32 bit reduced instruction set computer (RISC) instruction set architecture(ISA) developed by ARM Holdings. It was named the Advanced RISC Machine and before that, the Acorn RISC Machine. The ARM architecture is the most widely used 32-bit instruction set architecture in numbers produced. Originally conceived by Acorn Computers for use in its personal computers, the first ARM-based products were the Acorn Archimedes range introduced in 1987.
In 2005, about 98% of the more than one billion mobile phones sold each year used at least one ARM processor.As of 2009, ARM processors account for approximately 90% of all embedded 32-bit RISC processors[5] and are used extensively in consumer electronics, including personal digital assistants (PDAs), tablets, mobile phones, digital media and music players, hand-held game consoles, calculators and computer peripherals such as hard drives and routers.
ARM cores are used in a number of products, particularly various PDAs and smartphones. Some computing examples are the Acorn Archimedes, Apple iPad and ASUS Eee Pad Transformer. Some other uses are the Apple iPod portable media player, Canon PowerShot A470 digital camera, Nintendo DS handheld games console and TomTom automotive navigation system.
Since 2005, ARM was also involved in Manchester University's computer, SpiNNaker, which used ARM cores to simulate the human brain.
The very first ARM-based Acorn Archimedes personal computers ran an interim operating system called Arthur, which evolved into RISC OS, used on later ARM-based systems from Acorn and other vendors.
The ARM architecture is supported by a large number of embedded and real-time operating systems, including Windows CE, Windows 8,.NET Micro Framework, Symbian, ChibiOS/RT, FreeRTOS, eCos, Integrity, Nucleus PLUS, MicroC/OS-II, QNX, RTEMS, BRTOS, RTXC Quadros, ThreadX, Unison Operating System, uTasker, VxWorks, MQX and OSE.

Unix-like

The ARM architecture is supported by  Unix and Unix-like operating systems such as:

  • Android
  •  
  •  Bada
  •  
  •  BSD
  •  
  •  iOS
  •  
  •  Linux
  •  
  •  Plan 9 from Bell Labs
  •  
  •  Inferno
  •  
  •  Solaris
  •  
  •  webOS
  • Linux
    The following Linux distributions support ARM processors:
    APEXAR PDK
    Android
    Arch Linux Arm
    Ångström
    CRUX ARM
    BackTrack
    Chrome OS
    DSLinux
    Debian
    ELinOS
    Fedora
    Gentoo
    GoboLinux
    iPodLinux
    Maemo
    MeeGo
    Mer
    MontaVista
    RedSleeve
    Slackware
    T2 SDE
    TimeSys
    Ubuntu
    webOS[citation needed]
    Wind River Linux
    BSD
    The following BSD derivatives support ARM processors:
    RISC iX(Acorn ARM2/ARM3-based systems only)
    FreeBSD
    NetBSD
    OpenBSD
    iOS
    Solaris
    OpenSolaris
    Windows
    Microsoft announced on 5 January 2011 that the next major version of the Windows NT family (Windows 8)will include support for ARM processors. Microsoft demonstrated a preliminary version of Windows (version 6.2.7867) running on an ARM-based computer at the 2011 Consumer Electronics Show.The ARM architecture is also supported by Microsoft's mobile operating systems, Windows Phone and Windows Mobile. ARM is also supported on Microsoft's Embedded OS, Windows Embedded CE which is now called Windows Embedded Compact. This latest version supports ARMv 5,6 and 7. Windows CE 5 is the underlying OS for Windows Mobile and Windows Embedded Compact 7 is the underlying OS for Windows Phone 7. The smaller Microsoft OS .NET Microframework uses ARM exclusively.
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